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Please tutor help me as soon as possible??Q.1)Homeowner is purchasing homeowner’s insurance. This policy has a $7,000 deductible, so that if you have a claim and the damage is less than $7,000 owner pays for it out of pocket. However, if the damage is greater than $7,000, the owner pays the first $7,000 and the insurance pays the remaining balance. In the current year there is a probability of .079 that owner will have a claim. IF owner have a claim for damages on the home, the damage amount is normally distributed with a mean of $9,000 and a standard deviation of $2,000. Build a Monte Carlo simulation model to show out-of-pocket expense in this scenario. Use a data table to run 5000 iterations of the model. Analyze the results of the 5000 iterations to find how often a claim was filed and how often the claim amount met or exceeded the deductible. Show both as a percentage of the 5000 iterations. Which type of distribution was used for the probability of a claim occurring?Which type of distribution was used for the cost of a claim?In this model, owner should not experience an out of pocket expense when also experiencing a claim.As part of analysis of the model, summarize your data table by calculating how often owner experienced a claim and how often the claim amount met or exceeded the deductible. Also include the average & sample std dev for the claim amount. For the following 2 questions, make a copy of the worksheet on which built the model. need to modify inputs to the model to test calculations. Making a copy of the completed model will keep from having to redo work.Any easy way to accomplish this is to right-click your model sheet, and choose “Move or copy”.This question will require to alter model to test calculations.Set the uncertainty for a claim such that a claim happens. Set the Cost of a claim to 8000. What is the out of pocket expense with these settings?Set the uncertainty for a claim such that a claim happens. Set the Cost of a claim to 6000.Which type of distribution did you use for the probability of a claim occurring?Which type of distribution did you use for the cost of a claim?In this model, you should not experience an out of pocket expense when also experiencing a claim.As part of your analysis of yo model, summarize your data table by calculating how often you experienced a claim and how often the claim amount met or exceeded the deductible. Also include the average & sample std dev for the claim amount. For the following 2 questions, make a copy of the worksheet on which built model. will need to modify inputs to the model to test calculations. Making a copy of completed model will keep from having to redo work.Any easy way to accomplish this is to right-click your model sheet, and choose “Move or copy”.This question will require to alter your model to test calculations.Set the uncertainty for a claim such that a claim happens. Set the Cost of a claim to 8000. What is the out of pocket expense with these settings?Set the uncertainty for a claim such that a claim happens. Set the Cost of a claim to 6000.Q.2)In this you get to choose your scenario – you can make team building plan for A.     You are a manager of a small marketing business unit in a local tertiary institute.The scenario for option A is a follows:Your chosen organisation has had a change of direction and senior management are on a crusade to grow team effectiveness. You have been away on a management team building workshop but this was focussed on developing the managers as a team.Your manager is now talking to you about how you might develop your own team.LUCKILY you have been studying a Business Communication paper which has given you some great ideas on how to plan a team building programme.This is a two-part assignment.Q 1. You are required to design a team building programme.Apply the six steps suggested by Dyer (1994). You should describe the goals and the approach you will take to each. Remember that this is a plan of what you intend to do, it should act as a guide and help your team to understand what the team building programme will entail. You have to explain the 6 steps of dyer with full explanation and relevent examples. You have to put digram of team building process.Your plan should also include a planning schedule/timetable to give an overall perspective on the roll out of the programme. you will need to have a time table for the whole thing. So today i have started this in two days i will collect all the data . The next day i will have diagnosis and within the next day i will also have a plan or maybe i will come up with the plan in two more days. In the next day we will implemented and we will give it one week to see how things is going and than we will do evaluation. so you team building plan should nit be more than two weeks. so in your time table you need to have time table for you as a manager when each of the steps will take place and also a time table around the planning stage or the implementation stage how you are gone a implement a team building program. so I am gone a take them out for a group activity on the third day of this program what group activity have you do how long what should be the desire result or what are you looking to get out of it . The main time table or a you need to have for whole process which i said to you should be around two weeks ok so planning you are planning on how to fix those problems which you have diagnosed and what are the tools that you can implement to fix them so tools will be team bonding exercises, one on one interviews again or mock drills, mock marketing drills those will be implementation tools. Evaluation is the next stagewhere you will evaluate if all these implementations are actually working or not how will you know if they are working or not what will give you the indectation they are working or not results .so you as a manager your role is either coordinate this with that external process and the same time you constantly motivating all those team members to achieve that goal which is your first thing setup goal vision . Remember you are the marketing manager you are building a team so you need to follow all the instruction that i given 6 step each step should have heading and your explanation below ok . and a time table of how this is gone a look which could be the starting point , looking at the system 6 stages this is how much time it will take this what we implement and than you explain each step .keep in mind it should be a working document for your manager, and most importantly for you and your team (so don’t be too wordy). This part of the assignment is not an essay or a report, it is a plan – so spend some time thinking about how you will structure it.Q 2: give a narrative using academic sources and relevant theory to justify how your plan reflects business communication theories and models. I need long explanation.please provide evidences or references 4 to 5.Q3.)Company Background The company utilizes the First Tennessee Bank name in the state of Tennessee, its primary market and where it has dominant market share. Outside Tennessee (with the exception of suburban Memphis within Mississippi and Arkansas, and suburban Chattanooga in Georgia), it utilizes the First Horizon Bank nameplate, the company’s official name. First Tennessee is the only major bank headquartered in the state. Until recently, it had expanded into Northern Virginia (2003), Maryland (2003). The bank is a full-service provider of financial products and services for businesses and consumers. On the path to becoming the Chief Marketing Officer of First Tennessee Bank, Dan Marks has shown all the earmarks of being a “numbers guy.” There’s the natural sense of skepticism—a need to see the proof in the numbers—that comes along with being the analytical sort. Do bank marketers have a unique way of thinking, of looking at the world? Marks affirms his belief that they do, but with a caveat. “Within banks, marketing people tend to be great at seeing opportunity and conceptualizing new ideas,” explains Marks. “But in today’s banking market, it’s increasingly important to view them with a critical eye, to discern where it makes most sense to focus the bank’s resources. That’s the balance—between creativity and discipline, between art and science— that we need to strike.” What Marks had in mind went beyond budgets to the very heart of First Tennessee’s marketing processes, with granular metrics and analytics providing the basis for optimization. “Our aim was to shift from the ‘marketing-as-an expense’ mindset to the idea that marketing is a true profit driver.” The market that Marks is talking about is defined not only by increasing competitive intensity, but also by the strategic challenges it presents to banks, not least of which is how to optimally focus marketing resources. Banks offer a more diverse portfolio of services than before, and they do so over a wider range of channels. While this trend has given banks more latitude to compete, it has made formulating and modulating marketing strategies, tactics and programs considerably more complex. That’s because as the range of options has grown—a good thing by any measure— marketing resources are as scarce as ever. To optimize how they invest them, banks need a way to continually measure their effectiveness, learn what works and adapt over time. For banks today, having more ways to communicate with customers is a good thing. But it has also made it harder for banks to figure out where and how to most profitably commit their marketing resources. Leveraging predictive analytics, First Tennessee Bank is applying the ultimate acid test. It’s combining a granular understanding of the needs of customer segments with real P&L data to optimize its marketing spend, focusing on programs that deliver the highest ROI. First Tennessee’s ability to target its campaigns more intelligently has increased its response rate by 3.1%, cut key marketing costs by nearly 20%, and enables the bank to get the most from its resources. Selling First Tennessee’s President of Banking on the idea wasn’t hard. Putting it into place required action on a number of fronts. Conceptually, think of an upside-down pyramid, with the technical capability to do predictive analytics at the bottom, underpinning the effort. Though it’s an essential foundation, its enablement represented a relatively modest share of the effort. More extensive (and the next level up in the pyramid) was the need to secure the business intelligence (from the bank’s data warehouse and finance organization) and from that develop the framework for ROI-based modeling. Based on product parameters like fees, spread and account balances, the model would create tiers of profitability for different kinds of products and accounts and—by extension— different segments of customers. At the top of the inverted pyramid was Mark’s biggest challenge and, in many ways, the most important ingredient to his success— driving change at the process level. In this context, the key processes relate to choices made by marketing managers and within the lines of business around program funding. Should, for example, more funding be put into customer acquisition activities like lead generation? Or should the funding emphasis be on retention and cross-selling opportunities? Traditionally, such decisions were the epitome of “in-the-box thinking”— guided by a mix of past experience, intuition and conventional assumptions about where the opportunity is. Mark’s aim was to promote a new way of thinking about opportunity that would permeate the entire organization. “The message we’re getting across to our people is a new way of managing and optimizing our marketing resources around ROI—one that looks ‘under the covers’ at the relative profitability of all these programs and uses that as the basis for decision-making,” says Marks. “We understand that the most effective way to drive this change is not ‘top-down,’ but through a dialogue that moves all of us— including the LOBs—towards this new way of thinking.” First Tennessee used to structure its marketing campaigns around product lines. Over the last few years, the bank has developed a highly systematic and targeted approach. Here’s how it works. Start with a granular understanding of each customer’s banking needs drawn directly from lots of customer data points. Using predictive analytics models developed by Marks’s staff, each customer is “scored” on their likelihood to purchase each product in First Tennessee’s portfolio. The corollary benefit of this approach is that it helps the bank’s marketers to pinpoint product clusters that represent “sweet spots” for cross-selling opportunities. That’s just the beginning. What sets the First Tennessee approach apart is how it applies a rigorous, systematic approach to prioritizing which opportunities make it to the campaign stage. By combining product revenue and cost information from its data warehouse with the segment data discussed above, First Tennessee’s model generates a quantitative measure of the expected profitability of a given product offered to a specific subset of its customers, such that each product/segment offer under consideration is assigned an expected ROI value. With this hierarchy established, Marks and his team now have an evidenced-based framework through which to prioritize programs and allocate resources accordingly The bank’s performance numbers also underscore the effectiveness of ROI-based optimization. For instance, the rate of response to its marketing campaigns has risen 3.1 percent, a reflection of its ability to more accurately target offerings to specific customer segments based on their needs. First Tennessee’s recent growth in market share, producing gains across most of its geographic footprint in and around Tennessee, provides yet another window on its success. Overall, the bank has tallied a 600 percent return on its investment in predictive analytics through more efficiently deployed resources. By gaining the ability to target the most attractive segment for specific offers— a “quality over- quantity” approach— First Tennessee has been able to optimize its campaign expenditures, evidenced by a 20 percent reduction in mailing costs and a 17 percent reduction in printing costs. Looking down the road, Marks expects tight resources and intense competition to be par for the course in the banking market. But with predictive analytical capabilities in place, he sees these conditions as only heightening the bank’s hunger for opportunity, since it has the ability to pursue it efficiently. “We’re committed to profitability and we’re committed to strengthening our customer relationships through every aspect of the way we do business,” says Marks. “Predictive analytics gives us the intelligence and insights we need to follow through on this commitment.” How did Dan Marks build an analytics culture? Business