+1443 776-2705 panelessays@gmail.com
  

Part 1:

Instructions: Please read over the Pre-sentence Investigation Report below. Next, answer the questions regarding the PSI for Steven Williams.  

Imagine you are the judge reviewing the PSIR below. List five things you would consider when sentencing Steven Williams. Why do those five things stand out? What if the reporting officer had left those five things out of the report? Would that have altered your decision- making process regarding Mr. Williams?

Part 2:

Instructions: After reading this scenario, assume you are before Judge Judy.  You need to keep things brief.

A.   Prepare and write a PSI review.  What would be the highlights of this scenario that you would tell the judge that would cover the core categories?

B.   What information is pertinent that would give a good description of the client that would benefit an appropriate sentencing?  Remember to be brief in your comments to the judge, but also relay to her the PSI core categories information.

C.   What sentence would you recommend to the judge? If you recommend jail time or probation, list an additional intermediate punishment/sanction appropriate to the offender. Explain your response.

Case Scenario:

You are a probation officer assigned to the case of Joe, a 21 year old man convicted of burglary from a business during the nighttime. Joe admitted to and was convicted of breaking into the City Liquors And Smokes and stealing cash from the register, and several cases of beer. Joe was quickly apprehended and during his arrest, police found a switchblade in Joe’s pocket.  As a teenager, Joe already had a long history of juvenile offenses. His delinquency included truancy, shoplifting, possession of weapons (knives), and marijuana and alcohol possession and consumption. He frequently got into fights while in high school and he was known as a bully. As a juvenile, Joe spent a total of some 10 days in a juvenile facility. For the most part, when in trouble with the law, Joe received probation that included mandatory drug treatment.

Now an adult, Joe did not stop his criminal behavior. At age 19 he served 30 days in jail for drug possession and shoplifting. His current offense is the burglary and theft.

When you compiled Joe’s PSI, you discovered that Joe grew up in a two-parent household in which there was constant domestic abuse. His parents are now unavailable because his father abandoned the family years ago and his mother is currently undergoing inpatient treatment at a local drug clinic.  Joe currently lives with his girlfriend who is 4 months pregnant. Joe has a G.E.D. and minimal employment skills. At the time of his current arrest, Joe was unemployed. The only jobs he had are those of unskilled labor. His work history is scant and often Joe was fired from jobs due to tardiness.  Joe reports that he is in good health and there is no reported history of outpatient or in-patient treatment for psychological or emotional disorders. He admits to being a heavy alcohol drinker and occasionally smokes marijuana. After compiling information for the PSI, you believe that Joe has a severe alcohol addiction and limited education/skills to obtain steady employment.  You must now decide about Joe. What mode of correctional treatment, intermediate sanction, or sentence would you choose and why?  Remember to address Judge Judy’s questions as written in the instructions.

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

CRJU 4169: Correctional Forms and Reports

*

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Introduction

  • This chapter is intended to acquaint the student with the various forms and procedures in the field of corrections.
  • The real operational differences of corrections vs. patrol paperwork are minimal.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Correctional Incident Report (1 of 2)

  • The incident report is a written narrative that can be applied to a variety of incidents:
  • Escape attempts
  • Inmate disciplinary infractions
  • Hunger strikes
  • Inmate/staff injuries
  • The incident report is a written narrative that can be applied to a variety of incidents:
  • Discovery of contraband
  • Visitor infractions
  • Intelligence information
  • Building maintenance concerns
  • Damage to jail/prison property
  • The incident report is the most common form that will be used in any correctional setting.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Correctional Incident Report (2 of 2)

  • The incident report serves a variety of purposes:
  • Use of less-than-lethal devises to control inmates
  • Discharge of a firearm or other weapon
  • Use of force to control inmates
  • Staff or inmate injury
  • Inmate suicide or suicide attempt
  • Instead of the elements of a crime, the incident report would document the rule infraction violated.
  • The same techniques and procedures for the narrative of the law enforcement case report apply to the correctional incident report.
  • Documenting an incident in a correctional facility is very important, as this report could be used later to charge an inmate for a criminal offense.
  • Therefore, the incident report must be accurate and free of any grammar, spelling, or word use errors.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Inmate Disciplinary Form

  • For anyone working in a correctional facility, the inmate disciplinary form will probably be the second most common form used on a regular basis.
  • The inmate disciplinary process is an administrative process, not a judicial process.
  • The purpose of this administrative process is to secure the good order of the institution.
  • In all correctional incidents resulting in a request for disciplinary action, documentation must include, but not be limited to, the following information:
  • Specific institutional rule violated
  • A formal statement of the charge
  • Any usual inmate behavior
  • Any staff witness
  • An explanation of the events that includes:
  • People involved and events that transpired
  • Time and location of the occurrence
  • Any physical evidence and its disposition
  • Any immediate actions taken
  • Staff signature, date, and time of report

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Pre-Sentence Investigation Report (P S I R)

  • When an offender is found guilty or pleads guilty to an offense, the court of jurisdiction will usually have a P S I R completed by an officer of the court or a parole officer.
  • The P S I R is the history of the offender that may be used by the judge in determining whether or not other factors influenced the offender during the commission of the crime.
  • The P S I R will usually have the following information:
  • Age
  • Social information
  • Personal information
  • County of conviction
  • Evaluation of recommendation
  • Description of the current event
  • The P S I R will usually have the following information:
  • Criminal history
  • Summaries of all previous community placements and terminations
  • Victim impact statements
  • Initial needs assessments
  • Level of supervision inventory
  • Any other documents that may be needed in determining decision
  • Some P S I Rs are completed with the help of the original police report.
  • The case report may be helpful in completing the P S I R, but do not copy and paste it directly from the report into the PSIR without proofreading it for the accuracy.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Figure 15-1 Adult Pre-Sentence Investigation Report (1 of 3)

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Figure 15-1 Adult Pre-Sentence Investigation Report (2 of 3)

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Figure 15-1 Adult Pre-Sentence Investigation Report (3 of 3)

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Right Way to Write

  • Correctional forms and reports are very similar to law enforcement documents.
  • The same general principles describing law enforcement report writing apply to correctional officers.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Tips for Correctional Forms

  • In most instances, correctional paperwork and forms will resemble law enforcement paperwork and forms.
  • The same basic principles and writing style presented for law enforcement report writing in this textbook apply to correctional paperwork.
  • Every correctional, probation, or parole agency will have some minor modifications regarding their specific paperwork.
  • Review and be familiar with your agency’s policy and procedure manual and standard operating procedures regarding all professional written correspondence.
  • Remember, anything written that involves someone under custodial/correctional care can be subpoenaed into a court of law.

*

Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved

?

*