+1443 776-2705 panelessays@gmail.com

HomeWork 1:

Reflection:

After watching the video “The Musical Spectacle of Spider-Man” Link and reading the article, “Broadway’s ‘Spider-Man’ Musical Turns Off the Lights at Last” Attached I want you to reflect on these and discuss your opinions and thoughts related to what it “takes” to make it as a Broadway theatre production? What were you surprised by regarding the process?

250 to 300 words.

HomeWork 2:

For this discussion topic, you will first engage in a self-care activity. 

“Self-care is any activity that we do deliberately in order to take care of our mental, emotional, and physical health.” Read more here: https://psychcentral.com/blog/what-self-care-is-and-what-it-isnt-2/

The initial response to the prompt should be well thought out.  It should be one robust paragraph at a minimum (4-6 sentences).  If you use any outside information (this includes words, thoughts, ideas, images, etc.), be sure that you cite and reference it accordingly.

Response Prompt:

1. Briefly (1-2 sentences) identify what you did for your self-care activity.

2. In 4-6 sentences, address whether or not colleges and universities should be required to provide “mental health days” to help to address the mental health problems among students.

H O U R LY N E W S

L I S T E N L I V E

P L AY L I S T

T H E AT E R

DONATE

Broadway’s ‘Spider-Man’ Musical Turns Off The
Lights At Last
January 3, 2014 · 3:26 AM ET

Heard on Morning Edition

JEFF LUNDEN

4-Minute Listen P L AY L I S T Download

Transcript

“Dark” day: On Dec. 20, 2010, actor Christopher Tierney suffered a harrowing fall and severe injuries during a performance of
Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark. The show updated its safety protocols, and Tierney returned to his roles in April 2011.
Jemal Countess/Getty Images

Play Live Radio

Reeve Carney (right) handed off the lead role in Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark to successor Justin Matthew Sargent in
September 2013. The show closes Jan. 4, and the Smithsonian Institution announced today that it’s acquiring Carney’s
costume.
Rob Kim/Getty Images

“Some of the things I described in the stage directions we weren’t actually able to
render,” he says. “And so some of the story points that were perfectly clear in a reading
became a lot fuzzier when we finally hit the stage.”

Gerard, for his part, thinks the reliance on costly, complicated special effects might
have been one of Spider-Man’s first mistakes. “Most of the time when Broadway tries
to be the movies, it’s a terrible failure,” he says.

And as Spider-Man was about to begin previews on Broadway — after a series of long,
expensive technical rehearsals — it was clear that some of those effects weren’t going
to work at all. Take the million-dollar spiderweb that was supposed to hang over the
audience at the end of the show for a spectacular battle sequence.

“It turned out that the web net, they just couldn’t get it to work,” Berger recalls. “It just
kept catching on things, and so they scrapped it. And suddenly we didn’t have an
ending.”

When the show gave its first preview in November 2010, it was plagued by technical
difficulties. Actors were left dangling above the audience, and the show fast became a
Twitter phenomenon. As months of previews went by, Spider-Man turned into the
center of a media feeding frenzy. Stephen Colbert joked that it might be changing its
title to Spider-Man: Notify Next of Kin.

Related NPR
Stories

Critics, tired of waiting for the show to invite the
media, bought tickets and gave scathing reviews.
Michael Cohl, Spider-Man’s lead producer, says he
took some of that criticism to heart and asked Julie
Taymor to make significant changes to her
directorial vision.

“She was absolutely convinced that her vision and
her show was going to make it,” he says. “We were
convinced of the opposite, ’cause it had been
playing for four months.”

Long story short: Taymor was sacked, and a new
team was brought in. The show closed for 3 1/2
weeks for major revisions, only to reopen to equally
scathing reviews.

“By opening night, I think, the chance of getting an
objective review, you know, had gone out the

window,” Glen Berger says.

Still, audiences came. The show ran for more than 1,000 performances, but everyone
agrees that Spider-Man was ultimately done in by impossibly high operating expenses;
it cost between $1.2 million and $1.4 million to stage each week. Jeremy Gerard thinks
the loss will be epic.

T H E AT E R

‘Spider-Man’:
Don’t Be So
Quick To Write
Off The Dark

M O N K E Y S E E

‘Spider-Man’:
Worked Over
And Reworked,
Does It Work
Better Now?

M O N K E Y S E E

Hey, Broadway-
Based ‘Spider-
Man’ Boosters:
Twitter’s Not A
Supervillain

Sign Up For Breaking News Alerts
Stay on top of the latest stories and developments, sent when news breaks.

What’s your email?

SUBSCRIBE

By subscribing, you agree to NPR’s terms of use and privacy policy. NPR may share your name and email

address with your NPR station. See Details. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy

Policy and Terms of Service apply.

More Stories From NPR

“When you factor in the very few streaks in which it took in more in the box office than
it was spending at the box office, when you factor in the lawsuits and the injuries and
the work that had to be done on the theater, I would say it’s going to be closer to an
entire loss,” he says.

Cohl, the producer, has plans to take versions of Spider-Man to Las Vegas, on an
arena tour, and to Germany — but no firm plans, at least not at the moment.

M O V I E R E V I E W S
‘Hamilton’: Look Around, Look Around, It’s On Disney+

Popular on NPR.org

A R TS & L I F E
Melania Trump’s Bright Green Dress On Final RNC Night Screams Meme

E L E C T I O N S

E L E C T I O N S
Fact Check: Trump’s And Biden’s Records On Criminal Justice

H E A LT H
How Many Coronavirus Cases Are Happening In Schools? This Tracker Keeps Count

R AC E
One Author’s Argument ‘In Defense Of Looting’

W O R L D
Records From Once-Secret Archive Offer New Clues Into Vatican Response To
Holocaust

E L E C T I O N S
Director Of National Intelligence Cancels Verbal Election Security Briefings

NPR Editors’ Picks

W O R L D
Coronavirus Cases Top 25 Million Globally As India Emerges As A New Epicenter

O B I T U A R I E S
Chadwick Boseman In His Own Words

H E A LT H
OPINION: Public Health Leaders Deserve More Respect

A U T H O R I N T E R V I E W S
Chris Murphy Says He Still Sees Hope For Progress Around Gun Laws And Racial
Justice

E D U C AT I O N
With Virtual Rush, Fraternities And Sororities Race To Pitch More Than Parties

M I D D L E E A S T
On Path To Normalize Relations, UAE Formally Ends Boycott Of Israel

R E A D & L I S T E N

Home

News

Arts & Life

Music

Podcasts

C O N N E C T

Newsletters

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Contact

Programs Help

A B O U T N P R

Overview

Finances

People

Press

Public Editor

Corrections

G E T I N V O LV E D

Support Public Radio

Sponsor NPR

NPR Careers

NPR Shop

NPR Events

Visit NPR

terms of use

privacy

your privacy choices

text only

© 2020 npr

Article continues after sponsor message

Regardless of how critics and audiences eventually responded, Spider-Man: Turn Off
the Dark was always going to be one of the most-discussed shows in Broadway history.
It had songs by U2’s Bono and the Edge; it was directed by The Lion King’s Julie
Taymor; it was based on a hit Marvel franchise; there were going to be flying stunts
right over the audience’s heads.

And then somehow it all went very wrong, from injured actors to huge cost overruns.

“Spider-Man will be legendary because of the cost,” says Jeremy Gerard, who covered
the show for Bloomberg News, “and because of the injuries, and because of the
ridiculous press attention that was paid to it.

“But ultimately,” Gerard says bluntly, “it’s a bad show.”

Now Glen Berger, the show’s co-author, has written a juicy tell-all memoir called Song
of Spider-Man. He says that way back in 2007, when the show had its first reading for
producers and investors, everyone was convinced Spider-Man was going to be a
monster hit. Berger sat next to the actors, reading fantastical stage directions.