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HomeWork 1:

Reflection 1:

After you have read “What is “Repertory” Anyway?”, Attached. watched the video “50 Years of Yale Repertory Theatre” “Link” and read the PDF “Charlotte Repertory Theatre” Attached. I want you to reflect on what it means for Charlotte, as a major American city, to not have a Professional Repertory Theatre in its city? Think of what you can glean about why Repertory theaters are important (and different than Broadway shows) and what Charlotte misses by not having a ‘Rep’ theatre in our city. 

250 to 300 words needed.

HomeWork 2:

Reflection 2:

After watching the 2 videos

1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPGZj3_De6g

2) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoymZr7BB-8

I want you to reflect on both of these videos and discuss/reflect on the difference of purpose between Broadway and Community Theatre. What is, in your opinion, the major difference in their purpose and how does Community theatre clearly exemplify those differences?

250 to 300 words needed.

HomeWork 3:

Reflection 3:

After watching the 2 videos

1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrPzkFOpMIc

2) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzxLuJbeJk8

I want you to reflect on both and discuss your opinions and thoughts on the importance of Educational Theatre and why some people believe that studying/introducing young people to theatre (and art in general) is as important a development and educational tool as STEM etc.

In addition, after you discuss this, please take a moment, at least a paragraph and discuss your own experience of art education (either theatre or some other art form) and what impact it might have had own you in your growth (even if you did not decide the arts was in your professional future).

400 words needed.

BY KENNETH JONES
FEB 20, 2005

? ? ? ? NEWS  

Lacking Money and Support, Charlotte
Repertory Theatre Closes Its Doors Feb. 20

 

Charlotte Repertory Theatre, the North Carolina LORT
theatre that has been ?nancially troubled for years, will
shut its doors for good Feb. 20, the last day of its run of
The Exonerated, the theatre announced in a press
statement Feb. 19.
Its productions of Private Lives and God’s Man in Texas have been cancelled.

William Parmelee, board chair, announced the decision to close “after an exhaustive communications,
assessment, stabilization and renewal plan was developed and presented to civic, community and business
leaders, but did not produce the ground swell of support that would have been expected or needed for The Rep to
survive,” according to the closing notice.

“It is very unfortunate that there was little community support for a core cultural organization—The Rep—in our
city,” Parmelee said in a statement. “We feel that it is a tremendous loss to the quality of life for our entire region.
Charlotte Repertory Theatre is the only accredited professional theatre in the region—it indeed is a major cultural
loss that will be felt for many years to come.”

(North Carolina has other resident Equity theatres in its borders, including Triad Stage in Greensboro, Playmakers
Repertory Company in Chapel Hill, North Carolina Theatre in Raleigh, and others with union af?liations.)

Charlotte Repertory Theatre was founded in 1976 and “has been under-funded and under-capitalized since its
inception,” according to the statement. “In the last few years, it has felt the brunt of lost funding because of the
economic downturn and changes in funding priorities.” Subscribers and single ticket holders will be contacted
regarding refunds.

According to its website, The Rep, originally called Actors Contemporary Ensemble (ACE), was founded by Steve
Umberger in 1976. Under Umberger’s and co-director Jane Hadley’s direction, ACE became the region’s ?rst

professional theatre. In 1984, Mark Woods, founder of the North Carolina Shakespeare Festival, joined the
company. Woods changed the name to Charlotte Repertory Theatre, transitioned the theatre to year-round status,
and created the theatre’s ?rst af?liation with Actors’ Equity Association. In 1990, Keith Martin was hired as
managing director. Under Martin’s direction, the Rep merged with Umberger’s own company, PlayWorks.

In December 1992, the Rep found a new artistic home in the North Carolina Blumenthal Performing Arts Center,
“which provided an essential ingredient toward realizing its mission – a facility in which the theatre could realize
the breadth and scope that a diverse season would require,” according the Rep website. In 1998, the Rep was
invited to join the League of Resident Theatres (LORT), the industry’s organization of professional regional
theatres.

In Fall 2003, the Rep completed its move into a new production facility in the historic Charlotte neighborhood
known as NoDa (North Davidson). This move enabled the Rep’s operations to function under one roof, for the ?rst
time in the theatre’s history. The nearly 18,000-square-foot facility was home to the Rep’s administrative of?ces,
rehearsal space, set construction, as well as costumes, props and set storage.

The Rep billed itself as the Central Carolinas’ only fully professional LORT theatre. Among productions seen there
were The Miracle Worker with Hilary Swank (under the brief artistic directorship of Michael Bush, who returned to
Manhattan Theatre Club when he found too little support in Charlotte), Angels in America, Proof, A Tuna
Christmas, The Glass Menagerie and much more.

Our Blog

THE REPERTORY TRADITION

PlayMakers is one of only a very few repertory companies remaining in a country that

was once chock full of them. Since the 1850s, almost all of the nation’s 75 regional

theatres have moved to the line production model

(http://howlround.com/repertory-is-the-answer), which requires hiring and

housing a different set of directors, designers, actors, and production personnel on a

show-by-show basis.

In contrast, the repertory has been a model of making theatre in which a resident acting

company rehearses during the day and performs a rotating repertoire of shows each

night. Historically this meant theatres would hire a company of around seven actors

who could fill “stock roles.” (https://www.britannica.com/art/stock-company)

They would keep a number of plays at the ready and often present often a different one

each night of the week, supplemented by the preparation and rehearsal of new plays

during the day.

Talented rep companies could have dozens of shows in their repertoire, keeping sets in

storage, ready at a moments’ notice for a change in the interest of the company’s

artistic director or the appetites of the audience.

WHAT REPERTORY MEANS AT PLAYMAKERS

Here at PlayMakers, we consider the

talent of our resident company of actors

and other theatre professionals as the

base for producing a season full of both

newly imagined classics and plays hot off

the presses. The company is key.

Our diverse resident acting company

turns the idea of “stock” characters on its

head as we work with UNC’s Department of Dramatic Art (http://drama.unc.edu/)

to prepare any actor to take on any role. Our six veteran actors lead the company and

WHAT DOES “REPERTORY” MEAN, ANYWAY?

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serve as faculty in the Department, while thirteen young professionals in UNC’s

Professional Actor Training Program round them out. We get to choose our season

around their abilities and interests, even pre-casting some roles two years in advance.

We also employ resident designers, artisans,

dramaturgs, and production personnel, all of whom

perform double duty as faculty or graduate students.

So each season is also filled with shows that serve

these incredible theatrical professionals by presenting

them with a wide scope of settings to play with: from

realism to impressionism, regency chic to the fashion-

of-the-week, intricate woodworking to towering

scaffolds of iron.

WHY THIS IS AWESOME

This is why former Artistic Director Joseph Haj called PlayMakers a sort of “teaching

hospital” for professional theatre artists in training. Top professionals from all corners

of the theatrical apparatus come here to make great work in our community, including

the likes of Tyne Rafaeli (http://playmakersrep.org/artists/tyne-rafaeli/), Annie

Golden (http://playmakersrep.org/artists/annie-golden/), Jennifer Caprio

(http://playmakersrep.org/artists/jennifer-caprio/), and Tim Mackabee

(http://playmakersrep.org/artists/tim-mackabee-2/) as guest artists. This ensures

that each production is as vital as can be without losing a grounded sense of

community.

But the greatest advantage of our repertory model is that our resident company gets to

work together continuously, leading to deeper relationships and “more theatrical,

delightful, provocative, and inspiring theatre.”

(http://howlround.com/repertory-is-the-answer) Our commitment to being a

company of play-makers who live and work right here in the Triangle also means

creating theatre that is specific to the community we serve—a continuous re-

investigation of our shared interests and concerns.

A big part of this continuous re-investigation is the other meaning of “repertory.” In the

next installment of this blog series, we’ll explore what the “rotating repertory” means

here at PlayMakers.