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Unit 3 DB: Why be Concerned About Plagiarism?

Unit 3 DB: Why be Concerned About Plagiarism?

The resources in this unit and so far in the course have focused on how to cite information. When you use a source in your writing, you have to make sure to cite it or you may run the risk of plagiarizing it. But, what is the big deal of plagiarizing? This discussion board examines plagiarism.

Initial Post

Let’s consider a scenario: You have been working for a fairly well-established investment firm for the last four months. You and a coworker were both assigned to write a report on the same startup business to determine if you should invest in it. Your coworker asked to see your report to verify some data. The next day, you and your coworker hand in the same report.

In your initial post, consider these questions:

· How would you feel in this situation?

· How would you deal with this type of plagiarism situation in the workplace?

· What actions should your boss take?

Readings and Resources

 

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

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Developing a Thesis Statement

Developing a Thesis Statement

In terms of structuring your essay, the thesis statement typically goes at the end of the introduction. In your introduction, you set up what you are writing about by explaining the key points you will use to support your thesis.

Kepka, J. (2015). Oregon writes open writing text. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read pp. 65-69

Jeffrey, R. (2016). About writing: A guide. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read p. 9
 
Read p. 9 – Alternative Formats

Complete this activity to to learn how writing a thesis statement is not just for academic work. It can also help you write more effective emails to your instructor or to your boss.

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Activity: Using a Thesis Statement for Better Emails
 

Activity: Using a Thesis Statement for Better Emails – Alternative Formats

·

Avoiding Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism

Now that we are focusing on using evidence in your work, it is important to understand the significance of avoiding plagiarism. Plagiarism is taking someone else’s ideas and using them as your own without giving credit. Self-plagiarism is also a form of plagiarism. You can actually plagiarize yourself if you resubmit work you used in a previous class. If you ever want to reuse work, then you need to make significant changes to the previously submitted material and check with your current instructor about what you need to revise.

Kepka, J. (2015). Oregon writes open writing text. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read pp. 89-99

Jeffrey, R. (2016). About writing: A guide. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read p. 46
 

Read p. 9 – Alternative Formats

Complete this activity to learn more about how to identify—and avoid—plagiarism and self-plagiarism.

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Activity: How to Avoid Plagiarism and Self-Plagiarism
 

Activity: How to Avoid Plagiarism and Self-Plagiarism – Alternative Formats

Citing evidence is very important for avoiding plagiarism and self-plagiarism. We reviewed using direct quotes in the last unit. Now, we will take a look at this interactive document to see how to paraphrase information.

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Activity: Citing Evidence by Paraphrasing
 

Activity: Citing Evidence by Paraphrasing – Alternative Formats


Unit 2 DB: Organizational Culture

Unit 2 DB: Organizational Culture

For this discussion, research an organizational culture for a company like Google, or use your personal experiences working at an organization. 

1. First, concisely describe three (3) aspects of your organization’s culture making the connections between this week’s reading materials and the company you’ve chosen. 

2. Next, is it innovative, team-oriented, collaborative, ethical, or something else?  Explain which aspect is most important in guiding employee’s behavior and which aspect is most important for managers leading a team and making decisions.

3. Finally, you MUST post the link for the company you’ve chosen that shows where you have researched their organizational culture.

Readings and Resources

 

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

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Readings and Resources

Readings and Resources

eBook:

In this Unit, we are taking sections from two different resources to connect the concepts of the external environment and organizational culture.  As you read, think about how these concepts connect and how both are key to understanding how to effectively manage internally and externally. 

Bright, D. S. & Cortes, A. H. (2019). Principles of management. OpenStax.

· Chapter 4 Introduction

· Section 4.1 – The Organization’s External Environment

· Section 4.2 – External Environments and Industries 

Learn the complexity of organizational culture, its key dimensions, and techniques to change a culture from this reading.  

Lumen Learning. (n.d.). Principles of management. 

· Module 9: Culture and Diversity

Articles, Websites, and Videos:

This article goes beyond defining organizational culture and explains its connection to organizational growth. 

· Mercadal, T. (2020). Organizational culture. Salem Press Encyclopedia.

This article is about factors of the external environment and its influence on business operations.  

· Sheposh, R. (2020). External environment (specific or task environment). Salem Press Encyclopedia.

 Please use the link located below to watch this required LinkedIn Learning video.

· Why Organizational Culture Matters (scroll down for the link)

Supplemental Resources:

This well-written article is an optional resource, but a highly recommended read.  It debunks three myths related to organizational culture, then provides tools leaders can use to enhance organizational culture. 

· Howard-Grenville, J., Lahneman, B., & Pek, S. (2020). Organizational culture as a tool for change. Stanford Social Innovation Review, 18(3), 28-33.

This video fully explains six key external environmental forces. 



Unit 4 DB: Expressing the Pro and Con of an Issue

Unit 4 DB: Expressing the Pro and Con of an Issue

To give you some perspective on writing pro/con assignments, we will write about the pro and con of using a product.

Initial Post

You should select a fun product that is interesting to you. You can write one paragraph about the “pro” of using the product and one paragraph about the “con” of the product. You can pick your own product, but here are some suggestions:

· Non-water-proof mascara

· An SUV

· Organic food

· Scented candles

· Black flavored licorice

Readings and Resources

 

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

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Finding Evidence

How do you find evidence for the papers you are writing? You need to create topics to prove your thesis statement. You prove those topics by finding reliable evidence, which will come from Library resources as opposed to a Google search. Your research can then help provide a strong foundation for your ideas and arguments. You will want to keep track of that evidence through a references page.

Kepka, J. (2015). Oregon writes open writing text. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read pp. 101-103
 and  
pp. 111-112

Review this video to see how to navigate the library databases to find information for your work.

 Transcript

·

Evaluating Sources

When evaluating sources, consider who wrote them, where they were published, when they were published, and how they have been reviewed for accuracy. As you work through evaluating sources for the coming assignments, you can summarize the main points and use them in your writing. This interactive resource will show you how to summarize the main points.

Kepka, J. (2015). Oregon writes open writing text. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read pp. 113-117
 and  
p. 105

Complete the activity below to practice creating a references page in APA format.

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Activity: Creating a References Page


Unit 2 DB: Reliable Sources

Unit 2 DB: Reliable Sources

For this discussion board, we will consider what makes a source reliable and what makes a source unreliable.

Initial Post

You should answer the following questions in your initial post:

· What do you think the biggest difference is between an unreliable source and a reliable source?

· Why do you think a “reliable, scholarly” source is always stressed in academic writing?

READINGS AND RESOURCES

· Building an Essay

Building an Essay

In the previous unit, you wrote in the first-person perspective. Now, since we are using evidence, you will write in the third-person perspective to show you are objective. First person means using “I,” “me,” “us,” “we,” “our,” and so on, while third person means using “they,” “she,” “he”, “them,” “it,” “one,” and so on. You can say the same thing in third person as you did in first person.

· First person: I think masks should be worn by people when they are indoors in a crowd.

· Third person: Masks should be worn by people when they are indoors in a crowd.

Kepka, J. (2015). Oregon writes open writing text. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read p. 190
 

Read p. 190 – Alternative Formats

 and  
p. 30
 
p. 30 – Alternative Formats

·

Finding Reliable Sources

Finding Reliable Sources

What makes a source reliable? Any evidence that you use in your work needs to be reliable and academic. For a source to be reliable, it must come from a publication that is trusted and credible with information that can be verified. The article, especially if it deals with current issues, should have been recently published. The author needs to be an expert on the issue being written about and have the educational as well as the professional background to qualify them to write on this issue. For a source to be “academic,” the source should be produced from an academic publication that has been peer reviewed or reviewed by experts in the field. Scholarly articles are a typical example of both a reliable and academic source because they have been written by an expert, are published through an academic publication, and have been peer reviewed by other scholars.

Jeffrey, R. (2016). About writing: A guide. Oregon Writes.

·  
Read pp. 41-44
 
p. 30 – Alternative Formats

Optional Resource: Tutorial

You can review the tutorial below on finding reliable sources through Academic Writer, a great resource to help you with writing and APA format.

Important Note on Accessing Academic Writer: You will be taken to a sign-in page and then directly to the source. If you are already signed into Academic Writer, the link will take you right to the source.

How to Find Reliable Sources

Learn how to find reliable sources to use in your academic papers, including how to search for sources, evaluate sources, and organize sources with a reference management system.

Academic Writer

© 2020 American Psychological Association.

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Direct Quoting and Citing Evidence

Direct Quoting and Citing Evidence

You can cite evidence in your work in three different ways:

3. Direct quoting is taking the exact words from a source and using quotation marks around the quote.

3. Paraphrasing means taking a quote and putting it into your own words.

3. Summary is condensing information from a source in your own words, such as taking a paragraph and condensing it to just one sentence.

When you use evidence in your work, you need to include an in-text citation after that evidence. We will begin by reviewing how to format and use direct quotations.

Please review the Direct Quoting section of this interactive resource on citing evidence.

 Activity: Citing Evidence 
Activity: Citing Evidence – Alternative Formats

You can also find information on how to use quotations in the APA 7th Edition module accessible through the link in the menu on the left-hand side of the course.

1.

Post University Library Resources

Post University Library Resources

As a Post University student, you have access to the Library resources, which can be found by clicking on the Library tab in Blackboard. You will need to use those library resources to find academic and reliable sources to support your argument.

Please see this video for information on how to use the Post University Library to find information.

 Transcript Transcript – Alternative Formats