+1443 776-2705 panelessays@gmail.com
  

 

Assignment 3: Presenting Your Historical Topic
Due: Week 10
Points: 175

Skill(s) Being Assessed: Problem Solving, Communication, Technology

Criteria for Success: In this assignment, you will:

  • Organize and effectively communicate your main ideas through visual presentation in a PPT.
  • Make a clear connection between historical strategies and current issues.
  • Clearly and effectively create an oral presentation that is in harmony with the visual slides.
  • Use evidence from previous assignments in the course to support claims.
  • Properly identify sources in SWS style.

What to submit/deliverables: PowerPoint presentation with voice-over in Week 10 Assignment of Blackboard.

What is the value of doing this assignment? This assignment gives you an opportunity to practice the skills of communication, technology, and problem solving. It will show that you can use the work you completed earlier in the course and present it in a well-organized and clearly communicated presentation in PowerPoint. Communication, technology, and problem solving are universal skills and ones you will continue to refine as you progress throughout your career. This assignment asks you to use what you’ve learned throughout the course to gather credible evidence using your problem-solving skills, form an argument using the critical thinking process, and present your argument using your communication and technology skills. The good news is that you’ve already laid the foundation with the webtext activities in Chapters 7, 8, and 9. This assignment will use what you started to format in PowerPoint in those activities to help you record your oral presentation and finalize your presentation.

Your goal for this assignment is to: Practice your communication, technology, and problem-solving skills. You will do this by applying what you know about PowerPoint and effective oral communication.

What you need to complete this assignment:

  • Your chosen topic and sources from Chapters 1–3 of the webtext.
  • The argument you formed in Chapters 4–6 of the webtext.
  • The PowerPoint presentation you created in Weeks 7–9.
  • The PowerPoint presentation you finalized in Week 10 with your voice-over recording.
  • Your completed assignment, uploaded and submitted to Assignment 3 in Week 10 of Blackboard.

Steps to complete: In Week 10, complete the assignment and submit it to the Week 10 Assignment 3 link in Blackboard using the following steps:

STEP 1: Review the scenario:

Imagine you represent your company at a service organization dealing with one of these two issues: Facing Economic Change or Engaging Civil Rights. Your supervisor has asked you to research information related to the history of one of these issues for your organization to help new employees and volunteers understand it better. Your predecessor already started a list of sample primary and secondary sources and collections of sources.

In this assignment, you will take the final step in creating your presentation to help new employees and volunteers understand how historical events can be applied to one of the issues currently affecting your organization.

STEP 2: Use the guidance in Chapters 7, 8, and 9 to build your PowerPoint presentation. The presentation should be 7–11 slides and incorporate the evidence and arguments from Assignments 1 and 2.

  • Be certain you include:
    • Title slide.
    • Sources slide.
    • Topic slide.
    • Evidence slides with evidence and visuals.
    • Slide that connects past events to current state for the topic focus you identified in Week 2.

STEP 3: Prepare notes for your oral presentation and add them to the presenter notes in PowerPoint.

STEP 4: Record a short (3–5 minute) presentation on your topic using the argument you created in Assignment 2 and the guidance provided in Chapter 10. Remember that your audience is new employees where you work.

STEP 5: Upload your assignment to Assignment 3 in Week 10 of Blackboard.

This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.

Grading for this assignment will be based on the following rubric:

Assignment 3 Rubric

America’s Relationship Status is Complicated:
Lessons Learned from Isolationism in World War I and World War II

Sample Student

Example text

1

Outline

My Topic

U.S. Isolationism: World War I

From Isolationism to Intervention: World War I

U.S. Isolationism: World War II

From Isolationism to Intervention: World War II

Making Connections

Sources

Example text

2

My Topic

What can we learn from United States isolationist foreign policy during the first and second World Wars to help inform our approach to international relationships today?

Colors of The Famous 369th Infantry in Parade in New York City https://catalog.archives.gov/id/533494.

My research question is, “What can we learn from United States isolationist foreign policy during the first and second World Wars to help inform our approach to international relationships today?”

3

Isolationism and World War I

World War I began in 1914

The U.S. remained neutral until 1917

Wilson re-elected on Isolationism

1916 Campaign slogan “He Has Kept Us Out of War”

Presidential Portait : https://www.whitehousehistory.org/photos/fotoware?id=86EC86A1CF434DEA%20B75C9792E3DEB3BD

Examples of Campaign Buttons | www.worldwar1.com

Although World War I began in 1914, The United States stayed neutral until 1917. Isolationism was a long-standing tradition dating back to the Revolutionary war, when America gained its independence from Great Britain. America was leery of becoming entangled with foreign nations ever since its inception. Wilson ran his 1916 reelection campaign on the fact that he kept America out of World War I. His reelection solidified the belief that the majority of voters wanted to continue to stay out of international conflicts. It was difficult for some to see how a foreign war could impact America.

4

Intervention in World War I

The sinking of the Lusitania

American citizens perished at Germany’s hands

Impacted America

Wilson’s League of Nations

Isolationist figures in U.S. opposed the League

Lusitania Headline: Hulton Archive/Getty Images

According to MacMillen, Wilson eventually came to see Germany as a menace to society and the world, and he came to advocating to make the world “safe for democracy” despite being elected as an isolationist (1). The sinking of the Lusitania would become one of the events that began to shift America toward intervention. Newspapers reported the sinking with emphasis on American lives lost (2). The U.S. would eventually intervene in World War 1 in 1917. As the war concluded, the battle in America between isolationists and interventionists heated up. Though Wilson tried to advocate for the League of Nations, powerful isolationist figures like Charles Lindbergh ultimately prevented Congress from sanctioning the League. The war sent the U.S. even further toward isolationism, with Congress passing Neutrality acts and placing limits on immigration to further solidify the country’s isolated position in foreign affairs. Norwich University offers the possibility that it was “perhaps isolationist Warren Harding’s election to the office of President that offered the greatest repudiation of the League of Nations and Wilson’s interventionism” (3).

5

Isolationism and World War II

Americans were leery of intervention in a second World War.

Long-term impacts of World War I on Americans.

Anti-immigrant/anti-European sentiments

1921 Emergency Quota Act, etc

Americans wanted to focus on problems at home.

Official Presidential Portait https://www.archives.gov/research/recover/fdr

Charles Lindberg Slogan http://charleslindbergh.com/images2/a3.jpg

With the Neutrality Acts and general isolationist sentiments in American society, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was faced with many challenges as he attempted to maintain effective leadership during global crisis. Americans had many years between the world wars to ruminate on the pros and cons of global conflict. World War II broke out and many Americans held staunchly against intervention. America had a lot of her own troubles to deal with and many people were still harboring bitter feelings about World War I. In the Four Freedoms address, FDR warned his people that contrary to popular belief that America was safe across the vast sea, it was important to take lessons from World War I to understand how the second world war was a threat to democracy – and a threat to America’s safety and future (4).

6

Interventionism World War II

Four Freedoms speech – January 6, 1941

FDR tried swaying Americans away from isolationism

Warned about possible threats to homeland

Pearl Harbor – December 7, 1941

Americans mobilized, supporting intervention

Wilson signing Declaration of War against Japan Dec. 1941
https://www.archives.gov/files/research/military/ww2/photos/images/ww2-01.jpg

In FDR’s Four Freedoms speech in 1941, he warned about the dangers of the isolationist path and appealed to Americans’ love for democracy. He asked Americans to heed his prior warnings that just because the war seemed far away, it didn’t mean it wasn’t having an impact on America or that there was no threat to the home country (4). Eleven months after he delivered his warnings, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Suddenly, the war had hit close to home and became an undeniable reality fast, and Americans mobilized to support intervention . Though isolationist sentiments didn’t fully disappear, many Americans came together to do their part to support the war effort. Some went to war and some stayed home and took on new roles to help the country and the war effort, forever changing the landscape of America.

7

Making Connections

Leadership challenges

Weigh pros vs cons

Consider all consequences (both neutrality and intervention)

Neutral but prepared

This Photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA-NC

President Wilson and President Roosevelt faced situations that made isolationist foreign policy challenging to uphold. American foreign policy during both world wars illustrates how difficult it was to balance the desires and fears of the American people with the presidential duty to keep America safe and prosperous. Today, President Trump often uses the slogan “America First.” The United States still faces foreign policy challenges around the world; however, similarly to World War I and World War II, many Americans may feel detached from those entanglements because they are not happening on American soil. Then and now, America’s leaders have been drawn into foreign entanglements despite isolationist and “America first” desires. We should take valuable lessons from past conflicts. We should weigh the pros and cons and always calculate threats to America carefully and with full consideration of ramifications of both intervention and isolationism. When encountering conflict outside of America’s borders, we should be neutral but prepared to react should America’s safety be threatened. We can take these lessons and apply them to our own lives when dealing with leadership decisions.

8

Sources

Margaret MacMillen. March 16, 2018. Why the U.S. Has Spent 200 Years Flip-Flopping Between Isolationism and Engagement: What does the United States want to be to the world? https://www.history.com/news/american-isolationism

The San Francisco Chronicle. May 8, 1915. Hundreds Perish When Lusitania is Torpedoed. https://s.hdnux.com/photos/45/60/06/9896344/7/940×0.jpg

Norwich University Online. November 6, 2017. Isolationism and U.S. Foreign Policy After World War I. https://online.norwich.edu/academic-programs/resources/isolationism-and-us-foreign-policy-after-world-war-i

Franklin D. Roosevelt. January 6, 1941. 1941 State of the Union Address “The Four Freedoms.” https://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/fdr-the-four-freedoms-speech-text/

Title goes Here: Be creative!
My title:
Will We Ever Eliminate War?

Professor Ruff

HIS 110

Date

Image retrieved from thegreatcourses.com

Image retrieved from thegreatcourses.com

This presentation focuses on causes and effects of the two major world wars and how those changes affected the United States. We will also discuss understanding those causes and effects can help us address current issues today and even predict or prevent future conflicts.

1

Outline (these are samples for a different topic – use your own research question for your outline slide topics)

My Topic

Major Causes of World War I – with evidence from your sources (sample topic only)

Major Effects of World War I – with evidence from your sources (sample topic only)

Major Causes of World War II – with evidence from your sources (sample topic only)

Major Effects of World War II – with evidence from your sources (sample topic only)

Making Connections

Sources

My presentation is broken down into 5 sections with historical examples – from both primary and secondary sources – to help us better understand what happened and what we can learn from it.

2

My Topic

What can we learn from the causes and effects of World War I and World War II to help prevent future wars?

Image retrieved from familysolutions.org

Here is where you restate your question for your listeners/viewers and then explain your methodology. What did you research to find the answer to the question and how did it make you think of certain connections to today.

3

Major Causes of World War I

Use Bullet points and clear phrases – not full paragraphs. This should be the information explaining the topic/title of the slide.

Provide main points in bullets and include a quote from the source to support your claims somewhere on the slide. Remember 85% or more of the slide should be in your own words – if you include a quote be sure to put it in quotation marks and cite it.

Cite all information you used from a source even when explaining it in your own words.

This is where you will format your information into bullet points.

Look at the bullet points you for this slide in the information section. Now write a speech in paragraph form where you explain EACH bullet in more detail. Give some of the examples that support the bullet points from your text (just explain in your own words, do not read straight sentences from the articles).

4

Major Effects of World War I

Use Bullet points and clear phrases – not full paragraphs. This should be the information explaining the topic/title of the slide.

Provide main points in bullets and include a quote from the source to support your claims somewhere on the slide. Remember 85% or more of the slide should be in your own words – if you include a quote be sure to put it in quotation marks and cite it.

Cite all information you used from a source even when explaining it in your own words.

This is where you will format your information into bullet points

Image retrieved from Teacherspayteachers.com

Look at the bullet points you for this slide in the information section. Now write a speech in paragraph form where you explain EACH bullet in more detail. Give some of the examples that support the bullet points from your text (just explain in your own words, do not read straight sentences from the articles).

5

Major Causes of World War II

Use Bullet points and clear phrases – not full paragraphs. This should be the information explaining the topic/title of the slide.

Provide main points in bullets and include a quote from the source to support your claims somewhere on the slide. Remember 85% or more of the slide should be in your own words – if you include a quote be sure to put it in quotation marks and cite it.

Cite all information you used from a source even when explaining it in your own words.

This is where you will format your information into bullet points

Look at the bullet points you for this slide in the information section. Now write a speech in paragraph form where you explain EACH bullet in more detail. Give some of the examples that support the bullet points from your text (just explain in your own words, do not read straight sentences from the articles).

6

Major Effects of World War II

Use Bullet points and clear phrases – not full paragraphs. This should be the information explaining the topic/title of the slide.

Provide main points in bullets and include a quote from the source to support your claims somewhere on the slide. Remember 85% or more of the slide should be in your own words – if you include a quote be sure to put it in quotation marks and cite it.

Cite all information you used from a source even when explaining it in your own words.

This is where you will format your information into bullet points

Image retrieved from sonlight.com

Look at the bullet points you for this slide in the information section. Now write a speech in paragraph form where you explain EACH bullet in more detail. Give some of the examples that support the bullet points from your text (just explain in your own words, do not read straight sentences from the articles).

7

Making Connections

This is where you connect the historical events, issues, trends you just discussed to today. What do they teach us? What are the similarities to issues going on today and how can we use what you have learned today as we encounter those similarities? Or what have we learned to prevent those problems or address similar issues etc. etc.? What predictions can we make?

Look at the bullet points you for this slide in the information section. Now write a speech in paragraph form where you explain EACH bullet in more detail. Give some of the examples that support the bullet points from your text (just explain in your own words, do not read straight sentences from the articles).

8

Sources

Author, Date, Title, Link. – List your sources in the order you used them and cited them IN YOUR PRESENTATION

Author, Date, Title, Link.

Author, Date, Title, Link.

Author, Date, Title, Link.