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1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis Leadership Response

 Mary Wright

The most recent crisis experienced in my firm was two years ago when the Covid-19 pandemic shut down most of the United States and other countries worldwide. Our CEO went into crisis mode with routine communication in varying formats. We received emails, videos, webcasts, and Town Hall forums. The firm was completely transparent with its plan to emerge from the pandemic stronger than when we entered it. We faced a challenge for adaptability and were taught to embrace the chaos. The firm provided us several outlets for support for mental needs, and it established networks for parents suddenly facing home-schooling their children along with the requirements of their jobs. Our CEO was sure to impart that the firm would weather the crisis by staying focused on maintaining safety and work-life balance for their workforce. We were already well-positioned to weather the epidemic as we were already equipped most of our workforce to operate remotely. The most difficult challenge was staying connected virtually since we were no longer working out of our office locations together. The impact was highly positive. We broke even the first year of the pandemic when we were confident we would fall short of our financial goals. We even profited some. These profits were passed on to the workforce as bonus payments.

I believe in times of crisis; leadership faces the same basic physiological response of “fight or flight” that is hard-wired in each of us. A leader that shies away from the spotlight during hard times and won’t communicate or offer any transparency will not garner much confidence from their workforce or the community in which they operate. Leaders must confront the situation boldly, adapt to the challenges, and engage with their teams (Nichols et al., 2020). Conversely, a leader who confronts the crisis head-on and seeks advantages where we can grow despite the setback will be viewed as honest and upfront about developments along the way. Confrontation and adaptation will bolster the trust within the workforce, and the community and the organization will emerge from the crisis stronger than ever. Leaders should understand their behavioral drives and continue to re-familiarize themselves with these drives. They can sometimes backfire during an emergency if the situation is not suited for their style of response (Barks, n.d.).

 

References

Barks, A. (n.d.). The behavioral mistake leaders make in crisis. The Predictive Index. https://www.predictiveindex.com/blog/the-behavioral-mistake-leaders-make-in-crisis/

Nichols, C., Hayden, S., & Trendler, C. (2020, August 2). 4 Behaviors That Help Leaders Manage a Crisis. Harvard Business Review. https://hbr.org/2020/04/4-behaviors-that-help-leaders-manage-a-crisis

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis Leadership Response

Larry Upshaw posted

One example that comes to mind is and injury that took place during an active shooter drill at my organization. A staff member was shot in the eye with a rubber bullet and was very hurt. The principal at the time completely ignored the teachers feelings and injury. She went on with the drill expressing the level of importance of being ready and prepared for whatever may come working in schools in this day and time. As a leader, you should never dismiss an employee’s feelings. It is a moral killer! 

All leaders should practice boosting the moral of the workers, showing them that you care and are human. Connected to them in personal manner. Having your moral low will not only ruin your flow but run good workers off. If you have no staff lead than you are not a good leader. 

Leaders should practice moral building throughout the year to show the staff that you not only care about the success of the company but the success of them as a person. Having high moral will allow you and your team to excel in ways you could not imagine. Take for example the moral that Former President trump had to deal with! It could not have been good. 

                                                                            References


https://study.com/academy/lesson/staff-morale-definition-importance.html

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis

Leadershi

p

R

esponse

Mary Wright

The

most

recent

crisis

experienced

in

my

firm

was

two

years

ago

when

the

Covid

19

pandemic

shut

down

most

of

the

United

States

and

other

countries

worldwide.

Our

CEO

went

into

crisis

mode

with

routine

communication

in

varying

formats.

We

received

emails,

v

ideos,

webcasts,

and

Town

Hall

forums.

The

firm

was

completely

transparent

with

its

plan

to

emerge

from

the

pandemic

stronger

than

when

we

entered

it.

We

faced

a

challenge

for

adaptability

and

were

taught

to

embrace

the

chaos.

The

firm

provided

us

several

outlets

for

support

for

mental

needs,

and

it

established

networks

for

parents

suddenly

facing

home

schooling

their

children

along

with

the

requirements

of

their

jobs.

Our

CEO

was

sure

to

impart

that

the

firm

would

weather

the

crisis

by

staying

focused

on

m

aintaining

safety

and

work

life

balance

for

their

workforce.

We

were

already

well

positioned

to

weather

the

epidemic

as

we

were

already

equipped

most

of

our

workforce

to

operate

remotely.

The

most

difficult

challenge

was

staying

connected

virtually

since

w

e

were

no

longer

working

out

of

our

office

locations

together.

The

impact

was

highly

positive.

We

broke

even

the

first

year

of

the

pandemic

when

we

were

confident

we

would

fall

short

of

our

financial

goals.

We

even

profited

some.

These

profits

were

passed

on

to

the

workforce

as

bonus

payments.

I

believe

in

times

of

crisis;

leadership

faces

the

same

basic

physiological

response

of

“fight

or

flight”

that

is

hard

wired

in

each

of

us.

A

leader

that

shies

away

from

the

spotlight

during

hard

times

and

won’t

commu

nicate

or

offer

any

transparency

will

not

garner

much

confidence

from

their

workforce

or

the

community

in

which

they

operate.

Leaders

must

confront

the

situation

boldly,

adapt

to

the

challenges,

and

engage

with

their

teams

(

Nichols

et

al.

,

2020

).

Conversel

y,

a

leader

who

confronts

the

crisis

head

on

and

seeks

advantages

where

we

can

grow

despite

the

setback

will

be

viewed

as

honest

and

upfront

about

developments

along

the

way.

Confrontation

and

adaptation

will

bolster

the

trust

within

the

workforce,

and

1.3 Leader Follower Behaviors and Crisis

Leadership Response

Mary Wright

The most recent crisis experienced in my firm was two years ago when the Covid-19

pandemic shut down most of the United States and other countries worldwide. Our CEO went

into crisis mode with routine communication in varying formats. We received emails, videos,

webcasts, and Town Hall forums. The firm was completely transparent with its plan to emerge

from the pandemic stronger than when we entered it. We faced a challenge for adaptability

and were taught to embrace the chaos. The firm provided us several outlets for support for

mental needs, and it established networks for parents suddenly facing home-schooling their

children along with the requirements of their jobs. Our CEO was sure to impart that the firm

would weather the crisis by staying focused on maintaining safety and work-life balance for

their workforce. We were already well-positioned to weather the epidemic as we were already

equipped most of our workforce to operate remotely. The most difficult challenge was staying

connected virtually since we were no longer working out of our office locations together. The

impact was highly positive. We broke even the first year of the pandemic when we were

confident we would fall short of our financial goals. We even profited some. These profits

were passed on to the workforce as bonus payments.

I believe in times of crisis; leadership faces the same basic physiological response of

“fight or flight” that is hard-wired in each of us. A leader that shies away from the spotlight

during hard times and won’t communicate or offer any transparency will not garner much

confidence from their workforce or the community in which they operate. Leaders must

confront the situation boldly, adapt to the challenges, and engage with their teams (Nichols et

al., 2020). Conversely, a leader who confronts the crisis head-on and seeks advantages where

we can grow despite the setback will be viewed as honest and upfront about developments

along the way. Confrontation and adaptation will bolster the trust within the workforce, and

Getting Started

As a follower, you may have experienced a leader that empowered you and you were able to have a strong sense of connection. The leader’s communication style was one that you could relate to and it was encouraging. However, there are times when a leader does not want to lose their control or power. Theory X leaders display behaviors that can stifle productivity and be counter-active to meeting the organization’s goals and objectives. As you prepare for this assignment, reflect on leaders you have been in contact with, what behaviors did you see that demonstrated a Theory X or Theory Y perspective? Have you seen a trend that Theory Y is more prevalent in today’s workplace?

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be able to:

· Describe the impact of leader perspectives about people in the organization on performance.

Instructions

1. Review the rubric to make sure you understand the criteria for earning your grade.

2. Read 
Chapter 1(PDF document)

 in the text, An Introduction to Organizational Behavior.

· Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a 
Creative Commons(new tab)

 
by-nc-sa 3.0(new tab)

 license. The original version can be found 
here(new tab)

.

3. For additional, optional reading, you may request a pdf of Chapter 1 in the Scandura book, Essentials of Organizational Behavior, that is listed in the references section at the end of the syllabus.   

c. You must request this resource directly from Online Campus Library Services (OCLS). OCLS will email the resource to you within one (1) business day, not including weekends and holidays.

c. Please include all the information needed for this request: author, publication year, title, and publication information (see the syllabus).

c. Email your request to 
[email protected](new tab)

 or fill out an 
Online Request for Services(new tab)

 form.

c. You may also call OCLS at 1-800-521-1848. OCLS hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.; and Saturday, 9:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. (Eastern Time). OCLS closes on Sunday, all university holidays, and holiday weekends.

1. Watch the video on Theory X & Y

1.

1. Read the article, 
The “Hawthorne Effect”(new tab)

1. Write a two – three-page paper (excluding title page and reference page) that addresses the following prompts:

a. In your experience, do the leaders of your organization operate more by Theory X or Theory Y perspectives? What are some of the pieces of evidence that would support your conclusion? (Feel free to change names appearing in your discussion to protect privacy). What is the impact on individual and/or team performance?

b. What are three-five key principles or practices that you might recommend for your organization to experience the benefits embedded in Theory Y as well as implications of the Hawthorne effect?

1. Be sure to include a brief introduction and conclusion to your paper.

1. Submit your completed assignment by the end of the Workshop week.

1. All papers are to be written and formatted in accordance with APA Guidelines (


7th ed(new tab)



). Papers must be logical, well organized, grammatically correct, and have correct spelling and sentence structure. Write in complete paragraphs of at least three sentences in length.

Getting Started

As a follower, you may have experienced a leader that empo

wered

you and you were able to have a strong sense of connection. The

leader’s communication style was one that you could relate to and

it was encouraging. However, there are times when a leader does

not want to lose their control or power. Theory X leader

s display

behaviors that can stifle productivity and be counter

active to

meeting the organization’s goals and objectives. As you prepare

for this assignment, reflect on leaders you have been in contact

with, what behaviors did you see that demonstrated a

Theory X or

Theory Y perspective? Have you seen a trend that Theory Y is

more prevalent in today’s workplace?

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be

able to:

·

Describe the impact of leader perspectives about people in

the organization on

performance.

Instructions

1.

Review the rubric to make sure you understand the

criteria

for earning your grade.

2.

Read

Chapter 1

(PDF document)

in the t

ext,

An Introduction

to Organizational Behavior

.

o

Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a

Creative

Commons

(new tab)

by

nc

sa 3.0

(new tab)

license. The

original version can be found

here

(new tab)

.

3.

For additional, optional reading, you may request a p

df of

Chapter 1 in the Scandura book,

Essentials of Organizational

Behavior,

that is listed in the references section at the end of

the syllabus.

a.

You must request this resource directly from Online

Campus Library Services (OCLS). OCLS will email the

res

ource to you within one (1) business day,

not

including weekends and holidays

.

b.

Please include all the information needed for this

request: author, publication year, title, and publication

information (see the syllabus).

Getting Started

As a follower, you may have experienced a leader that empowered

you and you were able to have a strong sense of connection. The

leader’s communication style was one that you could relate to and

it was encouraging. However, there are times when a leader does

not want to lose their control or power. Theory X leaders display

behaviors that can stifle productivity and be counter-active to

meeting the organization’s goals and objectives. As you prepare

for this assignment, reflect on leaders you have been in contact

with, what behaviors did you see that demonstrated a Theory X or

Theory Y perspective? Have you seen a trend that Theory Y is

more prevalent in today’s workplace?

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be

able to:

? Describe the impact of leader perspectives about people in

the organization on performance.

Instructions

1. Review the rubric to make sure you understand the criteria

for earning your grade.

2. Read Chapter 1(PDF document) in the text, An Introduction

to Organizational Behavior.

o Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative

Commons(new tab) by-nc-sa 3.0(new tab) license. The

original version can be found here(new tab).

3. For additional, optional reading, you may request a pdf of

Chapter 1 in the Scandura book, Essentials of Organizational

Behavior, that is listed in the references section at the end of

the syllabus.

a. You must request this resource directly from Online

Campus Library Services (OCLS). OCLS will email the

resource to you within one (1) business day, not

including weekends and holidays.

b. Please include all the information needed for this

request: author, publication year, title, and publication

information (see the syllabus).

2.1 Assignment. Devotional- The Good Builder – Part 2

Getting Started

In our last devotional, we examined the opening chapter of the Bible and its presentation of God as builder of the universe and humans as the key “why” for God’s creative acts. Much has happened between Genesis 1 and our passage this week from Genesis 11 as we look at the tower of Babel.

Your devotional reflection for this workshop will help you consider another element of the “why” question – one related to your ultimate objective in life.

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be able to:

· Recognize strong leadership skills through leaders in the Bible.

Background Information

Read or 
listen(new tab)

 to 
Genesis 11:1-9(new tab)

.

The Biblical narrative between the creation account in Genesis 1 and the tower of Babel account in Genesis 11 includes some well-known stories. Adam and Eve (and all humanity) rebel (sin) against God in chapter 3. Cain kills his brother Abel in chapter 4. The human population grows, but so does human evil, leading to Noah’s story of a judgment flood and an ark of salvation in chapters 5 through 9. I suspect we all would like to know “why these people did what they did” – our fundamental question of organizational behavior as it relates to each of those stories. The opening of the Bible (and the whole Bible!) is a case study in organizational behavior.

The organizational behavior connections continue in Chapter 10 of Genesis as the text describes Noah’s descendants while humanity re-populates the earth after the flood, which leads to the tower of Babel passage. In the opening verses of chapter 11, we find (at least) two problems that eventually lead to God creating the confusion of language.

First, as the population moves east (or expands), humans decide to stop. Note the end of verse 4 that says, so that we will “not be scattered over the face of the earth.” Why is this a problem? God’s original instruction to Adam and Eve is still in effect. Remember what was said near the end of the Genesis 1 passage. “God blessed and said to them, ‘Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth…” (New International Version Bible, 1973/1984, Genesis 1:28a). Stopping was an act of disobedience. They were supposed to grow and expand. Note the end of the Genesis 11 passage after God creates the language confusion. “From there the Lord scattered them over the face of the whole earth” (Genesis 11:9b). God’s acts at Babel push humanity outward to fulfil his original mandate.

Second, stopping the expansion was joined by a another human objective contrary to God’s expectations: “Come, let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves” (Genesis 11:4a). While it is likely that they began to build a stepped pyramid (called a Ziggurat) with a sky-colored chapel or shrine at the top to engage in worship (of something or someone, probably other than God), a crucial component is the idea of making a name for themselves. Looking back, again, at the creation account, God had said, “Let us make humans in our image…” (Genesis 1:26a). Although the image of God has very complex meaning, in the ancient near east, the term was used to denote the practice of kings setting up their image (statues, likeness, etc.) in new or conquered lands. In essence, wherever the image of the king could be found, the kingdom existed at that place under the king’s rule. Similarly, humans as the image of God is, in part, meant to convey that wherever humans are found, the kingdom of God exists (or is supposed to!). That is, we represent the name and presence of God. The tower builders are rejecting the idea of representing God (i.e., making His name) and instead are making a name for themselves. Sometimes the answer to why people do what they do are disappointing!

God thwarts the rebellious acts by taking away their ability to communicate clearly with each other, and they are forced to scatter. In a bit of irony, they do make a name for themselves, but the tower of Babel is now associated with human failure not human greatness. They should have stuck to the original plan.

After you have read the passage, consider the following prompts:

1. As you think about your life, consider a different element of your “why?” in life. Is it about you? Or is it about something (or someone) greater? What is the “big why” emerging from your worldview? What is your purpose?

2. As you think about your work as a leader, how does your personal “big why” interact with what you are doing? How you do it? What you are building (or your vision or your plans or…)? What is your organization’s “big why?”

3. If you have a perspective different from a Christian worldview, what does that perspective suggest about the “big why” of life?

4. What are the implications for leaders? What are the implications for organizational behavior (individuals, teams, organizations)?

Instructions

1. Review the rubric to make sure you understand the criteria for earning your grade.

2. Review the 
Genesis 11:1-9(new tab)

 and prompts provided in the Getting Started and Background sections. 

3. Write a one-half to one-page reflection paper (Word document; @250 words double-spaced = one page) that shares your thoughts/perspectives on the themes of this devotional and submit it using the Assignment submission page by the end of the workshop week. Be sure to apply APA formatting guidelines.

2.1 Assignment

.

Devotional

The

Good Builder

–

Part

2

Getting Started

In our last devotional, we examined the opening chap

ter of the

Bible and its presentation of God as builder of the universe and

humans as the key “why” for God’s creative acts. Much has

happened between Genesis 1 and our passage this week from

Genesis 11 as we look at the tower of Babel.

Your devotional reflection for this workshop will help you consider

another element of the “why” question

–

one related to your

ultimate objective in life.

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be

able to:

·

Recognize strong leadership skil

ls through leaders in the

Bible.

Background Information

Read or

listen

(new tab)

to

Genesis 11:1

9

(new tab)

.

The Biblical narrative between the

creation account in Genesis 1

and the tower of Babel account in Genesis 11 includes some well

known stories. Adam and Eve (and all humanity) rebel (sin)

against God in chapter 3. Cain kills his brother Abel in chapter 4.

The human population grows, but so

does human evil, leading to

Noah’s story of a judgment flood and an ark of salvation in

chapters 5 through 9.

I suspect we all would like to know “why

these people did what they did”

our fundamental question of

organizational behavior

as it relates to ea

ch of those stories. The

opening of the Bible (and the whole Bible!) is a case study in

organizational behavior.

2.1 Assignment. Devotional- The

Good Builder – Part 2

Getting Started

In our last devotional, we examined the opening chapter of the

Bible and its presentation of God as builder of the universe and

humans as the key “why” for God’s creative acts. Much has

happened between Genesis 1 and our passage this week from

Genesis 11 as we look at the tower of Babel.

Your devotional reflection for this workshop will help you consider

another element of the “why” question – one related to your

ultimate objective in life.

Upon successful completion of this assignment, you will be

able to:

? Recognize strong leadership skills through leaders in the

Bible.

Background Information

Read or listen(new tab) to Genesis 11:1-9(new tab).

The Biblical narrative between the creation account in Genesis 1

and the tower of Babel account in Genesis 11 includes some well-

known stories. Adam and Eve (and all humanity) rebel (sin)

against God in chapter 3. Cain kills his brother Abel in chapter 4.

The human population grows, but so does human evil, leading to

Noah’s story of a judgment flood and an ark of salvation in

chapters 5 through 9. I suspect we all would like to know “why

these people did what they did” – our fundamental question of

organizational behavior as it relates to each of those stories. The

opening of the Bible (and the whole Bible!) is a case study in

organizational behavior.

2.3 Assignment. Organizational Committment

Getting Started

What does employee commitment in an organization look like? In part, the answer to that question depends on how we define organizational commitment and the reasons that someone possesses (or does not possess) it. For example, a person can be committed to an organization because they “have to” (e.g., must have the income) or because they “want to” (e.g., find fulfillment in the organization mission). Employee commitment will probably look different depending on whether the person is showing up just to earn a paycheck or s